Some basic things to know for carrying concealed

Discussion in 'Conceal & Open Carry' started by DeaconKC, Jan 27, 2014.

  1. DeaconKC

    DeaconKC Member

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    Okay, here are some things I have learned about carrying concealed over the years.
    1. Smaller is better, yeah, I know some gunstore commando says if you're not packing a steel frame 1911, you're unarmed. A small, handy "always" gun in .32 beats a .44 Magnum at home.
    2. A good belt is mandatory. Forget the gopher skin designer thing from the boutique, get a heavy leather belt or a lined belt from a holster company to hold that extra pound or so in place.
    3. Spend a couple more dollars to get a holster from a reputable maker. They will last far longer and be more comfortable. Also, if you want to try out a holster, ask around. We all wind up with "the box of holsters" so be warned.
    4. Inside the waistband is the best for concealment, but is the least comfortable. A belt holster is the most comfortable, but you have to have a longer covering garment. Pocket carry is easy, but use a dedicated pocket holster to break up the outline, pleats are your friends here. And nothing else goes in that pocket.
    5. Don't cheap out. Make sure your carry gun runs 100% with your carry ammo.
     
  2. glock26USMC

    glock26USMC Administrator Supporter

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    I would prefer my "Glock 30SF" over a 1911 ;)
     

  3. Yeagerdad82

    Yeagerdad82 New Member

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    Thx for the tips, Im new to CC, and Im learning ! Anything I can glean from forums, helps !
     
  4. glock26USMC

    glock26USMC Administrator Supporter

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    That is what the forum is all about, don't be afraid to ask questions :)
     
  5. Easy CZ

    Easy CZ Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    And, remember kids, conceal carry is meant to be comforting, not comfortable. ;)
     
  6. NewToGuns

    NewToGuns New Member

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    Thanks for these tips. I'm learning before deciding what to purchase, as I'm saving up the funds to get quality.
     
  7. Easy CZ

    Easy CZ Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Good deal. Always better to pay with cash and educate yourself in the process. If I don't learn something new every day, I'm just being lazy.

    Be sure to check out Hickok45 on YouTube if there is a certain firearm you're interested in purchasing. He's knowledgeable, entertaining and fair.
     
  8. J-Will

    J-Will I'm a peacock, you gotta let me fly!

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    Dang it.. Reading the OP I was thinking this the whole time, scrolling down to post it and here it is.. Truth!!
     
  9. danf_fl

    danf_fl New Member

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    If I may add a couple of things:
    1. Where you go may dictate how you carry. (It is not nice to have your firearm clunk on the pew in church when sitting).
    2. Get a full length mirror. It not only helps when practicing the draw, but will help to identify the "print" your setup makes.
    3. Put the cell phone where you do not expose the firearm when answering the call from the spouse to pick up bread and use your non-dominant hand (this will not raise the jacket up to expose your setup).
    4. Concealed is concealed. Just as you don't want your butt to show when sitting on a diner chair, your firearm feels the same way.
    5. When the old girl friend tries to hug you, keep the arm on the side where the firearm is in the "low" position so she is not able to hug the gun also.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2014
  10. FlashBang

    FlashBang New Member

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    When done properly it is both. ;)

    .
     
  11. TechDiver

    TechDiver New Member

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    He's GREAT !!!
     
  12. Slack

    Slack New Member

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    Good points, but I disagree with OWB being more comfortable then IWB. It all depends on the position you are in. If I'm standing then OWB is more comfortable, not by much though. But, if I'm sitting I'd prefer IWB. And if I'm driving OWB is flat out painful.
     
  13. rjmorel

    rjmorel New Member

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    don't forget to blow out the lint and other pocket fluff every now and then. They get pretty nasty with pocket carry, rj
     
  14. Stillersfan

    Stillersfan New Member

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    Currently carrying my Walther PPS with Viridian C5L. Waiting for my holster for my CZ 75D PCR so that I will also be carrying in my rotation. Im also waiting on a CZ 75 P01 SDP that is on lay-a-way. That will also be first choice for my CCW. Remember .. You cant have too many CZ's :D
     
  15. Scout Actual

    Scout Actual New Member

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    I'd say one of the most important elements is practice! Dry-Fire practice drawing, reholstering, reloading, moving, malfunctions, etc for 10 mins a couple times a week.
     
  16. JONNIN

    JONNIN New Member

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    Decent generic advice but:

    2) why do you need a belt? I pocket carry a 9mm for reference? I can see it helping if you have a monster sized pistol but in #1 you recommended small..
    4) how is IWB > pocket for concealment? At best, they are equal, the gun isnt seen. Better? how? Honestly, as long as it is hidden and accessible, it gets a 100% score here, regardless of details?
     
  17. DeaconKC

    DeaconKC Member

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    Jonnin, In answer to your questions/observations:
    2. Unless you are built a lot differently than most folks, any time you hang 1-2 pounds extra on one side of your pants or skirt, it's gonna cause it to slide down somewhat. A good heavy belt will help with this whether you use a holster or clip at the waist or pocket carry. A flimsy belt will actually allow a holster to shift and slide when you need stability.
    4. Any waist holster will be quicker than a pocket holster. In a life or death emergency, an extra second could be the difference in you or your loved one's safety.

    My off duty carry is a KelTec PF9, one of the lightest and flattest 9mm's out there. Like my old Taurus 85 Ultralight it weighs 12 ounces empty. Load it and it's a pound. Now find something that weighs a pound that will fit in your pants pocket and leave it in there some evening. You will quickly see how that little weight affects your pants. And if you go with a larger gun, the difference is even more pronounced. For example the Glock 26 weighs 21 ounces empty and 26 loaded according to Glock. That's a pound and a half or a little less than 2 cans of Coke. The same weight in a belt holster is much more comfortable usually. I hope this helped.
     
  18. canik55carrier

    canik55carrier New Member

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    Here's my 2 cents worth, I carry my tri star c-100 on my belt under my shirt. Open carry is legal here so I don't worry too much if its gets seen from time to time. If I want to go a bit lighter on some days I carry a Taurus pt738 380 in a cell phone holder on my belt or in my pocket holster or sometimes in my ankle rig. Maybe not a good place for a quick draw but at least I not unarmed !!
     
  19. FALPhil

    FALPhil Crusty curmudgeon

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    My observation is that body shape has more to do with this issue than most people give credit.

    What I have observed is that, if a man has a body mass index in the normal range, properly fitted pants rest on the hips. The problem in the USA is that most grown men are above the normal BMI, and they require a belt because their waist has a larger circumference than their hips and their pants slide down.

    I made a concentrated effort a couple of years ago, and dropped a little more than 40 pounds. That got me well into the normal BMI range. What I found, and I carry a PF-9 as well, is that the way my new pants fit, I can pocket carry and you cannot tell that I am even if I do not wear a belt.

    So, in my opinion, the belt issue becomes less critical for small handgun concealed carry.

    When I do carry my full-sized steel 1911 (and I do from time to time), the belt issue is a more critical, because if I am performing any kind of even remotely vigorous activity, the dang thing flops around without a decent belt. This can be quite disconcerting. Combine that with the fact that my preferred 1911 carry is an open top pancake that relies on friction for retention, a smooth draw is impossible without a good belt.

    Good gunbelts don't need to be expensive. A well-made 1.5 inch Amish belt will do just fine, and last for years and won't lighten your wallet too much. If your preferred carry weapon still makes your pants sag with an Amish belt, that is a sure sign that you need to lose weight. There are many benefits to getting fit besides being able to conceal your carry handgun well.
     
  20. JONNIN

    JONNIN New Member

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    I have carried for closing in on 2 decades, most of it in the pocket, and have yet to need a belt. Maybe I am built differently, could be. Have not lost my pants yet :) I would not want to try it with very loose pants. Odds are I just am used to slightly tighter pants, I had a job that got me a lot of tips as a teen & 8 hours of quarters weighs more than any gun I have ever carried.

    The point though was concealment, not ease a access. I concede that mine is a little harder to get out. Practice makes perfect, hopefully, its not "slow" after doing it for a long time, but its not john wayne either.