The web between thumb and hand

Discussion in 'General Firearm Forum' started by AL Gal, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. AL Gal

    AL Gal New Member

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    Does that build up a strength on the skin and not feel bruised once you practice with your pistol a good bit?

    I have found that area is tender after going to the range to practice.
     
  2. NewToGuns

    NewToGuns New Member

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    Does that happen everytime and how long does it take before you start feeling it?
     

  3. glock26USMC

    glock26USMC Administrator Supporter

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    Personally I don't feel it, are you gripping the firearm too hard?
     
  4. AL Gal

    AL Gal New Member

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    I would feel it at the end of about 45 minutes at the range. But I may be holding too hard as I'm still getting comfortable with having a gun. I have a lot of respect for what it can do when needed for protection and to not be careless with it.
     
  5. jbardellini

    jbardellini Member

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    What gun are you shooting and does it fit your hand correctly?
     
  6. Easy CZ

    Easy CZ Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    What grip technique are you using?
     
  7. bubba2001

    bubba2001 New Member

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    never been a problem for me
     
  8. DHarkabus83

    DHarkabus83 New Member

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    I've never had a problem with any pain or fatigue in my hand(s) after shooting. Maybe your gripping the pistol too tight. Try loosening your grip a little and see what happens.
     
  9. Easy CZ

    Easy CZ Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    If I recall correctly, you're shooting a S&W Model 360 Airweight. That is most definitely NOT a range gun - meaning, it's no fun to shoot at the range. My hand would be hurting after 30 minutes, much less 45.


    You might try lighter 38 Spl loads to ease the pain - especially if you're going to shoot it for extended periods of time.
     
  10. Pancho_Villa

    Pancho_Villa Supporting Member Supporter

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    You may want to try some "target" wadcutter .38 spl. load in your gun. They are not easy to find around here cause Wally World doesn't sell hem and their are no gunshops within 60 miles.

    The ammo can be identified by having no bullet sticking out of the case. It is a reduced load and has less recoil. I am unsure if there is any other jacketed bullet load with a reduced charge that would do the same thing. And the factory wadcutters are about as expensive as the jacketed hoow points unless you reload them like I do. I use hand cast and sized wacutter bullets and reduced charges for .38 spl. loads that the wife and kids practice with. The lighter guns like my old Colt .38 spl. Cobra lightweight can have pretty vicious recoil with most of the jacketed ammo put out now except fo the reduced, fast expanding loads for short barreled guns. But, those can be expensive to practice with too. So I handload alot ot them and they are extremely accurate at ranges out to 20 yds. in most snubbie revos.

    Anywyay, here is a description of the wadcutter in .32 caliber. Normally the rounds are used in only revolvers and a few specialty target auto pistols cause of the feeding problems in autos. Obviously the sharp corners do not feed well in auto pistols.

    The ammo can usually be obtained at major gunshops, gun shows, and probably off the web dealeres. I could not advise you on the web dealers cause I buy nothing off the internet sites. If I buy any new ammo, it is usually at gunshows.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wadcutter
     
  11. Shooter

    Shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Do you have a large hand? I have friends who complain of hand pain, but they have huge hands and are over gripping. How's your grouping?
     
  12. Windy

    Windy Moderator Supporter

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    When I shoot my revolver I sometimes get a sore spot on my hand right where you indicated. It gets rubbed and I sometimes need to put a bandage on it. I now where a glove on my right hand when shooting. I know that isn't the pain your talking about, though. I have small hands and my revolver is a big 'un. I think you might be having a situation with the gun fitting you properly.
     
  13. papataylor

    papataylor New Member

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    I've never had that issue?
     
  14. danf_fl

    danf_fl New Member

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    Your grip should be firm.
    Think of a hammer. If the head does not swing, you will get tired. If the head swings too much, you chance losing the hammer when you hit the nail.
    The secret is to find the "happy medium"

    If you ever had a cut in the web between the thumb and index finger, you would see there is no muscle tissue for about .5 to .75 inches. So there is nothing to build up.
     
  15. AL Gal

    AL Gal New Member

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    Windy, tell me about this gun fitting properly. It feels comfortable in my hand. I think I'm tensing up waiting for the kick. And I was using the +P, rather than reg ammo.

    I need to get back to the range with the reg ammo and see if that makes a difference.
     
  16. Racer X

    Racer X New Member

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    The reduced recoil of a regular load, and not having a death grip on the pistol should take care of it. I shoot .22 rimfire pistols for about 90 minutes at a time once a week, and no problem at all.
     
  17. danf_fl

    danf_fl New Member

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    Where do the bullets land on the target? This will indicate anticipation or other problems.
    Yes, even gripping too tight.
     
  18. mgardner

    mgardner New Member

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    Roll your elbows in and out and watch to see the how it opens a gap at the top and bottom between the heels of your hands. You should find a grip where there is no gap at the top or bottom and the gun needs to rest firmly against your hand so it cannot accelerate into your hand and hurt you. Think of it this way. If you are against an object and it moves towards you it pushes you. If you are a ways away from the object as it accelerates it will hit you and hurt you.
     
  19. danf_fl

    danf_fl New Member

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    One problem that most new shooters develop is not having the barrel in line with the fore arm.

    Some triggers are so far forward that to get a good grip with the finger forces the firearm to put pressure on the joint of the thumb. Too little, and the hand and wrist are forced to accept the recoil.

    Physics class - More mass requires more energy to move. Make the mass the fore arm and let the energy of the felt recoil try to move it.

    Take your hand, form a "V" between thumb and index finger, put the handgun in the "V" with the barrel in line with the fore arm and your hand as high of a hold on the pistol as possible without getting "bit". Check the trigger and see if it requires you to move the firearm from that position to actuate correctly. If it does, then the handgun does not fit you.

    The straight back motion of the trigger is what you want. Most people have trouble moving the trigger finger straight back (in line with the barrel). The tendency is to move the firearm as they move the trigger finger. You don't want to move the firearm to the side as you move the trigger.
     
  20. mgardner

    mgardner New Member

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    Here's one of the best. K.C. is a tiny guy with very small hands. His forearm is nowhere near in line with the barrel (4 seconds in the video shows this). He uses opposing hand pressure (chest muscles push in) to control the gun and welds as much hand to the gun as he has. Gabby Franco, Michelle Viscusi and Tori Nonaka use the same grip because some people have small hands.

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgCKTiB-Ldo[/ame]