Vintage Military Firearms

Discussion in 'General Firearm Forum' started by SHOOTER13, Apr 14, 2014.

  1. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    Pictured below is my P38 built by Spreewerke GmbH, Metallwarenfabrik, in Berlin/Spandau Germany in 1942 during World War II.

    The Spreewerke inspection stamp consisted of an eagle above the number 88 (E/88), but the first 500 weapons made at the Spreewerke factory had Walther inspection stamps which consisted of an eagle over 359 (E/359) . (My specimen has a serial number of 246 and the Walther acceptance stamp E/359). The letters CYQ are the code used to designate construction at the Spreewerke plant, which produced around 285,000 units by the wars end.

    This specimen is also Wehrmacht stamped with an Nazi eagle over swaztika. The P38 is chambered for 9mm Parabellum and holds 8 rounds in the magazine. She also came with a black semi-hard leather holster that holds an extra magazine.

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  2. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    The Pistol Makarov (PM) is a medium-size, straight blowback action, frame-fixed barrel handgun. In blowback designs, the only force holding the slide closed is that of the recoil spring; upon firing, the barrel and slide do not have to unlock, as do locked-breech design pistols. Blowback designs are simple and more accurate than designs using a recoiling, tilting, or articulated barrel, but they are limited practically by the weight of the slide.

    The 9x18mm cartridge is a practical cartridge in blowback-operated pistols; producing a respectable level of energy from a gun of moderate weight and size. The PM is heavy for its size by modern US commercial handgun standards, largely because in a blowback pistol the heavy slide provides greater inertia to delay opening of the breech until internal pressures have fallen to a safe level. Other, more powerful cartridges have been used in blowback pistol designs, but the Makarov is widely regarded as particularly well balanced in its design elements.

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    Pictured above is my Cold War relic from the year 1961...an East German Makarov chambered in 9x18mm. She actually shoots pretty good for an old warhorse...
     

  3. Pancho_Villa

    Pancho_Villa Supporting Member Supporter

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    A "Ballerina Molester" or Ballester Molina Argentine Service Pisttol. The Bal-Mo was a simplified version of the Systema Colt 1911 made in Argentina under license by Colt. The top half of the gun has some parts that can interchange with a 1911 type pistol. Barrel, recoil spring, link, and possibly the extractor will swap out. Mags will work also. However the lower end or receiver is mostly a copy of the STAR auto pistols made in Spain. It is marked 11.25mm or .45 acp cal. The British government ordered a number of these made during WWII.

    Scuttle butt on these guns is that they were made from the melted down steel of the pocket battleship Graf Spee. The WWII German ship was scuttled at the mouth of the Platte River in Argentina after making repairs from a confrontation with the allies. Some historians verify this myth and some discount it. The pistols were made from the late 30s till @ 1953. The steel is very good and the pistols are durable and well made. Most likely the pistols were made from steel bought by the Bristish from the U.S. and shipped to Argentina to make the pistols.

    An account of the sinking of the Graf Spee and the pistol is in the Feb. 2014 issue of American Riflemanmagazine.

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    A Russian Makarov in regular .380 cal instead of 9mm Makarov. This one is more of a comercial pistol made for the U.S. market. It has an adjustable rear sight.

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    A Croation PHP in 9mm Luger cal. This pistol was made using ideas borrowed from Walther in the barrel and upper section, lower was more like a Beretta. It was desighed and made in haste to meet the requirements of a service pistol.

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  4. Ajole

    Ajole New Member

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    We have some similar tastes! Love the Walther!

    EG Mak and CZ-82

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    The EG Mak and the Bulgie brother

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    The Russian commercial Mak in 9x18.

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    P-64.

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    Most of my Milsurps are rifles.


    1936 VZ-24 BRNO Mauser, on the bottom, plus an M48A Yugo on top and a '42 Borgiswalde K98k in the middle

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    Savage built 1942 No 4 Mk 1*

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    Swiss K-31, 1950's

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    1893 Spanish Mauser, Ludwig Loewe Berlin, but Sporterized

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    M44, 1945, Izzy

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    1943 Springfield Garand

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    2 of the three Mosin 91/30s, a 1931 Hex Tula, and a '42 Izzy, the other is a '43 Izzy

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    The Tula can shoot, this is three shots, irons at 50 yards

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    8mm Hakim,

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    Russian SKS, 1954 Izzy

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    Last edited: Apr 24, 2014
  5. Ajole

    Ajole New Member

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    Spanish FR-8, .308, 1953

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    Sporterized 1916 BSA No 1 Mk 3

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    1917 No 1 Mk 3*

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    Romanian SKS (painted by a previous owner)

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    Last edited: Apr 24, 2014
  6. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    Awesome collection sir...!!
     
  7. Ajole

    Ajole New Member

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    I made a rack using some plans off 7.62X54R.net
    to hold some of them.

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    Then I added legs to give me a place for my ammo cans.

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  8. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    The M1 Garand (officially designated as United States Rifle, Caliber .30, M1), was the first semi automatic to be generally issued to the infantry of any nation. Called "the greatest battle implement ever devised" by General George S. Patton, the Garand officially replaced the bolt action M1903 Springfield as the standard servive rifle of the United States Armed Forces in 1936 and was subsequently replaced by the selective fire M14 in 1957.

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    Pictured above is my Springfield Armory M1 Garand...manufactured in November 1944. She is pictured with an original M1942 16" bayonet ( very rare...most were cut down to 10" ) and a repo M7 fragmentation grenade launcher.

    Below...a repo 1943 ammo belt:

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    Last edited: Apr 24, 2014
  9. Warhawk

    Warhawk New Member

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    My collection isn't as nice as Ajole but here are a few pics.

    Two Steyr rifles
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    Mosin top type 53, 91/59, and M38
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    This one was before I cleaned it up.

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  10. Ajole

    Ajole New Member

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    I saw a type 53 last week at a pawn shop. $200, sewer pipe barrel, beat up stock. Just couldn't do it.
     
  11. Warhawk

    Warhawk New Member

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    I can't believe the prices people are asking for those things.you can find them locally for $160-175 but even that is too much when you look at them.
     
  12. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh New Member

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    I need to start "family" pics. Here is my sons 1943 M38 Swede. It was a total basket case when I bought it. Not any more!!
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  13. Warhawk

    Warhawk New Member

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    Jpatternson. That is a great looking stock.
     
  14. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh New Member

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    Thanks, it is a Boyds forest laminate. 6 coats of BLO with a flannel cloth over 3 days. Rubbed down after 4 hours each time w/ a clean dry flannel cloth. It was easy to fit to the action. Easiest I've ever done.
     
  15. Pancho_Villa

    Pancho_Villa Supporting Member Supporter

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    A mid 80s Chinese NORINCO SKS. Got it when they were still 60 bucks in the box. Chrome lined bore, 10 round fixed mag, Nice finish on these. With the original pig sticker, cruciform bayo open.

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    Another one like it in "Drag" or a fake Dragunov folder, spke bayo, 4X scope and the fugly "Duck Bill" type sorta detachable 30 round magazine. Both have chrome lined bores, both 7.62X39 cal. semi-autos. This one is the more common model that came packed in crates. Finish is good, but not nice like the boxed ones. Barrels on these are suppose to be press fitted and pinned to the receivers. The nicer ones had barrels threaded to the receivers. Both work just aas well. This one is for the kids to play Rambo.

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  16. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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  17. Ajole

    Ajole New Member

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    How about a 30-06 FN-49, Luxembourg military. Someone ground off the ears that protect the front sight.

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    Different sort of safety.

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    This is an odd one. 1891 Argentine Mauser, rebarreled to 7.62X39.

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    It can shoot! This was 10 rounds of Yugo surplus at 50 yards.

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  18. Ajole

    Ajole New Member

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    Romanian Tok, the TT-33

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    And the CZ-52

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  19. Ajole

    Ajole New Member

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    Chinese SKS...Probably a commercial version. I got it with a duckbill mag in it, then added the 20 round mag.

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    A Turk K Kale 8mm Mauser, with nice deep red wood

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    A Yugo and a Chinese SKS.
    I traded both off years ago, at a profit, but wish I had kept them both.

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    This is the Chinese scope rail, I think it was a special design sold as a unit with a box, scope and the mounts for this rail.

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  20. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh New Member

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    Really like the FN49, outstanding!!!