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Here is something I have not seen before. Easy to adjust sear engagement. Trigger breaks very clean. View attachment 1282 View attachment 1283 View attachment 1284 View attachment 1285
I find this very interesting. I’d be game to try it on a range toy gun and play with it for a long while to check it’s reliability before I’d put it on a self defense gun. I live in California, and any modifications to a self defense court will probably be used by a gun hating public prosecutor who will tell the jury how you “modified your gun to make it especially deadly and used unsafe no-factory parts to give it a dangerous ’hair trigger’“. I kid you not, any changes other than perhaps sights will be liberal court room fodder. Just in Cali and other big gun control states, prob okay in states with a more sane approach to guns.
 

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I find this very interesting. I’d be game to try it on a range toy gun and play with it for a long while to check it’s reliability before I’d put it on a self defense gun.
I would never, ever, modify any firearm like that whether for sport or for self defense. What you see in that picture is so unsafe that it approaches recklessness.

It also looks like what seems to be the firing pin block lifter has been modified and not in a good way.

What's in place to stop that set screw (that changes sear engagement) from moving on its own?

And I live in a very gun friendly midwestern state.
 

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I would never, ever, modify any firearm like that whether for sport or for self defense. What you see in that picture is so unsafe that it approaches recklessness.

It also looks like what seems to be the firing pin block lifter has been modified and not in a good way.

What's in place to stop that set screw (that changes sear engagement) from moving on its own?

And I live in a very gun friendly midwestern state.
You’d be right. The only way I’d test this out would be at my range where I’m often shooting alone. I’m no gunsmith so my understanding of sears and fire control groups is minimal. I’ve had 1911’s with trigger jobs to lighten the pull, it worked great until I started seeing hammer following after a couple thousand rounds and then I had a different smith sort that problem out. Sometimes things that seem to work great at first on a gun do not work well or safely over time.
 

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You’d be right. The only way I’d test this out would be at my range where I’m often shooting alone. I’m no gunsmith so my understanding of sears and fire control groups is minimal. I’ve had 1911’s with trigger jobs to lighten the pull, it worked great until I started seeing hammer following after a couple thousand rounds and then I had a different smith sort that problem out. Sometimes things that seem to work great at first on a gun do not work well or safely over time.
I would bet a lot of money that the pistol in the OP photos is absolutely not drop-safe.
 

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It would be much easier and safer just to replace the hammer on this pistol to get rid of the positive sear engagement than to modify the sear carriage to push the sear past the engagement on the hammer hooks. Any of the new aftermarket hammers have a neutral engagement sear angle on the hooks which does exactly the same thing safely.
 
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