CZ P10 C mag release

Discussion in 'CZ Pistol Forums' started by klimshelf, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. klimshelf

    klimshelf New Member

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    Christmas present. Love it, feels great shoots well, but the mag release is impossible for me to operate with either right thumb or forefinger - very stiff. And I have strong hands. Has anyone else experienced this? Is there a way to modify or lubricate the mag release that will make it easier to operate?
     
  2. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Member

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    It works better with a loaded mag, not an empty one! It will get better, and it does slam load quite nicely! If you are right handed you should be using your left thumb to release it, don't break your grip!
     

  3. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Member

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    If I remember I address this issue this weekend during a planned shoot ... in the cold ... BRrrrr

    The first P10 I handled had a stiff release, and I commented on it on the Glock site, but my own CZ came with a better one, and I found it is lighter with a loaded magazine. The release has to rotate a cam I believe, and when loaded some of the pre-stress is less, is how I explain it, but I am not a gunsmith. The technique is easy, using the opposite hand to do it while keeping your shooting hand in the same, stable position, and it is faster and more natural. Unlike a Glock, which I own, it is two-handed in operation, and that can save your life, trust me on that from street experience. There are many attributes such as grip angle, feels like a 1911 in your hand, the paintability is super, and the accuracy is excellent, even at longer ranges, like 100 and 200 yards, which I shoot mine at for training. It is boringly reliable, all of which makes this fighting handgun an all-around carry pistol, I love it, and I have owned more guns over 40 years than I like to remember.

    You have a great gun. Most civilians have never carried a gun when the chance of someone attacking you with deadly force was high, not unlikely as it is for most folks. When you on the streets with life and limb at risk you need a gun you have confidence in, not what others suggest, especially so of the Walter Mitty's out there, ask about with your local cops, pros on the streets, but remember some of the newbies are not as gun savvy as old-school cops, as PC staff members in most big police departments choose the guns purchased by folks who couldn't hit their foot with the barrel in their shoe!
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
  4. klimshelf

    klimshelf New Member

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    wildbill45, thanks for your reply. The first gun I bought was a Glock 17 that I got through a cop friend many years ago. I found it a bit large for comfortable carry and for the past decade have been carrying a Bersa BP9cc, which I love. It doesn't have the capacity of the big Glock but it's comfortable and very reliable, having never failed to feed anything I give it. I find my new CZ P10-C to be the most accurate handgun I've ever fired. It did have several stovepipes during the first 50 rounds but I'm hoping that clears up once it breaks in.
     
  5. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Member

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    has anyone else shot your CZ? Stove pipes are the shooter issues a lot of the time. Ammo can be the issue as well. How you control the gun with your grip is critical with all guns. Eliminating the possibility of shooter error, try another shooter ... with experience of course ... and see what happens. If the gun does not have enough resistance, due to a weak grip, the slide velocity may reach optimum speed to create enough energy to complete the function. The hand movement reduces the rearward energy before completely opening and tossing the brass.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2018
  6. klimshelf

    klimshelf New Member

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    That did cross my mind, and in fact, all but of those one stove pipes occurred when my wife was shooting the gun. She is an able shooter but likely doesn't have the grip or resistance that I have.
     
  7. Earl_Keese

    Earl_Keese Member

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    Manipulate the mag release while applying some downward pressure on the mag with the other hand. Mine works fine, but I'm told doing this several times will loosen the sticky ones pretty quickly. Mine had a couple stovepipes, but only with very light loads. CZ's are sprung for 124gr NATO ammo, which is pretty stout compared to cheap American range ammo.
     
  8. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Member

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    Maybe she just needs to put more mass into it, to lean her upper body into the stance she chooses to use! Which grip insert do you use for both of you; small, medium or large? When in doubt one size smaller is better than one size too big!

    On a very cold day I took my CZ and Sig 1911 out to demonstrate clearing jams to include stove-pipes, and shooting at 100 yards, which the CZ is the best I have shot yet, and that includes many, many, many guns! Here is the video if you wish. Learning to clear jams gives one confidence when a time comes that it may be a life or death skill. Ask any cop, a street cop at least, clearing jams is like wearing a seat belt.

     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018
  9. Boudiepitbull

    Boudiepitbull New Member

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    Is this is what I've heard called "limp wristing"? Ironically, the first time I heard of it was on a revolver forum (where it can't possibly happen). Interesting. Once she became conscious of her grip, did it change?
     
  10. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Member

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    People throw around terms they know little about, as poor gun handling and loss of control are just that, ask the poster to define what he or she is trying to express. They may mean the same thing discussed here, but maybe not.
     
  11. Boudiepitbull

    Boudiepitbull New Member

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    If I recall those conversations correctly, it concerned the inability of the gun to fully cycle because somehow the shooter was absorbing enough energy from the recoil that it impeded function. I didn't really believe it possible, but experiencing a failure to load properly and stovepiping does seem logical.
     
  12. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Member

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    No, the shooter was preventing the full cycle to load the slide to a required-to-function energy level. This has been going on since autos have lived.
     
  13. Boudiepitbull

    Boudiepitbull New Member

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    I think that was pretty much what I was trying to say...but I'll defer to you and let you have the last word.
     
  14. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Member

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    No last words here. Call it what you know, and that is fine with me, just offering other views. We will get to the same place, eh?
     
  15. gunnut47

    gunnut47 New Member

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    I have always heard it called limp wristing. But, it amounts to the wrist not being locked usually. As stated above, the firearm does not cycle properly. Try a firmer grip.
     
  16. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Member

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    Limp writing means different things to different folks. Just letting your wrist go light, or light control of the gun is not limp wristing if you keep mass on the grip. If you have seen any of my videos when I shoot most of my guns at 100 yards you will see the gun recoil higher, as I only hold the gun with enough force to control it, but overdo like in speed shooting for self-defense. When I am shooting the same gun at speed, I grip it like a Crocodile with a hold on your leg! Shooting requires adjustments, every shot, every technique is NOT ALWAYS THE SAME! Very experienced fighters, shooters, and thinkers know there are variable in-between all various things taught at schools. The best are skillful in going way beyond what is taught, and especially so on the internet. It takes a long time to develop the knowledge, skill, and minor muscle skills to make your implement do what you want it to do, be it a gun, sword, stick or a knife. These things are not taught as most instructors probably don't know them. Like the military everyone does the same thing, no exceptions as they play to the lowest denominator. Listen to what your trainer says, if you have one, most don't, then expand on everything and make up your own mind. The sights, gun, and your hands guide the bullet to where it should go and at what speed you can do it well accurately.

    Making your skills fit you is most important. You may not be an ex-cop or Marine, or a Navy Seal, so rolling down a mountain while shooting may not suit you. You may learn the difference between target shooting, long range shooting, and tactical shooting. There is a difference, and becoming skillful in all disciplines is best, but not for all as some have physical limitations or mental limitations so learn who you are and become the best. Limp wristing is not suitable for speed shooting, but shooting off-hand at 200 yards, it may be, etc... Watch the grip and control on the gun in this video when shooting long or close!

    Bear in mind I am shooting my new CZ right out of the box, straight from the gun dealer, and doing it all off-hand. The grip and stance may change, but the shooting is steady after adjusting as such.

     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
  17. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Member

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    1400 rounds later it is still working well, a little stiff on the left-hand side, but easier with the right-hand side ... both are good overall!
     
  18. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Member

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    " it amounts to the wrist not being locked usually"

    How one holds the grip of a pistol is determined by experience, as different shooting disciplines require change, most of today's internet experts know not such minor adjustments of minor motor controls of muscle movements. When being precise in slow shooting, such as bullseye or even shooting longrange targets as I do where speed is not the issue, the gun is barely held so muscle tension does not lesson control for such precise movements, as recoil control is not a part of the method, nor is time. I hold the gun just enough to keep it in my hand and the sight wobble as small as humanly possible, all things not possible in speed shooting, or defensive shooting. When folks see me shooting in my videos long distance the low experience folks always chime up and comment on what they do not know in any manner, it is funny and I do not bother to explain to such internet heros.

    For Example; tighten your grip and fist as hard as you can, while doing so try and move your hand up, down, or in small adjustments with control, you cannot do it, and this is what happens if you try to shoot, OFFHAND, no sandbaggers as that only counts in supported gun disciplines. The opposite is true if your hand is too loose while speed shooting in defensive shooting as you loose control and are dangerous and not shooting well enough to survive. These examples are just a small part of muscle movement techiques involved in sport and survival, and martial arts. Here is when the non-martial artists say, "Shooting has nothing to do with martial arts!" This is why I don't bother as they do not understand the concepts or application of such, as in truth, Martial arts has everything to do with it!