World's top 5 most dangerous spiders They can kill humans

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by maria26790, Oct 24, 2020.

  1. maria26790

    maria26790 New Member

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    More than 43,000 different species of spiders are found in the world. Of these, only a small number are said to be dangerous, and less than 30 (less than one-tenth of one percent) have been responsible for human deaths. Why are so few spiders harmful to humans? Much of the reason may result from the size differences between people and spiders. Spider venom is designed to work on smaller animals, but the venom of some species can produce skin lesions in people or produce allergic reactions that result in fatalities. It is important to understand, however, that “death by spider bite” is very rare since clinics, poison control centers, and hospitals often have various species-specific antivenin (the antitoxin) on hand to treat the bite.

    1:Redback Spider (Latrodectus hasselti)

    The redback is another cousin of the black widow L. mactans; however, this species is not as widespread. It is native to Australia, but it has spread to New Zealand, Belgium, and Japan through grape exports. (The spider often builds nests and webs on grape leaves and inside bunches.) The species is widespread throughout Australia, living in all of the continent’s varied environments, except for its hottest deserts and frigid mountaintops. The species is also found in urban areas, frequently making nests in human dwellings. The redback is identified by its prominent red stripe or hourglass-shaped mark on its black-colored back. This mark is more noticeable on female redbacks than on males.
    Redback spiders are not aggressive and are more likely to play dead when disturbed, but a female spider defending her eggs is very likely to bite. Bites also occur when the spider climbs into shoes or clothing and becomes trapped against the victim’s skin when he or she is dressing. Both male and female redbacks are venomous, but most envenomations primarily result from female bites. Only 10-20% of all victims bitten are envenomed. The venom is a mix neurotoxins called alpha-latrotoxins, which produces pain, sweating, rapid heartbeats, and swollen lymph nodes. The spider can moderate the amount of venom it injects, and the severity of these symptoms often depend on how much venom is delivered. More than 250 redback bites are treated each year in Australia, many with antivenin. Researchers and physicians are split on the effectiveness of redback antivenin, with some studies indicating that it was not effective in treating symptoms or relieving pain. Nevertheless, the last human death attributed to redback envenomation occurred in 1956.


    2:Funnel-web Spiders (family Dipluridae)
    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
    This family of spiders in the order Araneida are named for their funnel-shaped webs, which open wide at the mouth of the tube. The spider sits in the narrow funnel waiting for prey to contact the web. When this happens, the spider rushes out and captures the insect prey at the funnel’s mouth. The most important genera are Evagrus, Brachythele, and Microhexura in North America, Trechona in South America, and the poisonous members of the Atrax genus in Australia.
    The species Atrax robustus and A. formidabilis are large, brown bulky spiders that are much feared in southern and eastern Australia because of their venomous bites. Several human deaths from the bites of these aggressive spiders have been recorded in the Sydney area since the 1920s. An antidote to the main toxin in their venom has been developed which is effective if administered to victims soon after they have been bitten.
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